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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

MAIC teaches Marines more than just fighting

By Cpl. Tyler Viglione | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | August 08, 2014

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Students of the Martial Arts Instructor Course, practice techniques from the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program green belt syllubus at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Aug. 1. After each class, the Marines conduct guided discussions featuring past warriors and Marines who have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

Students of the Martial Arts Instructor Course, practice techniques from the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program green belt syllubus at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Aug. 1. After each class, the Marines conduct guided discussions featuring past warriors and Marines who have paid the ultimate sacrifice. (Photo by Cpl. Tyler Viglione)


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San Diego --

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program is taught to every Marine, but it takes a motivated and dedicated Marine to teach it.

Marines facing down the challenge of the Martial Arts Instructor Course spent time learning weapon of opportunity from the green belt syllabus at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Calif., Aug. 1.

“This part of the MAIC focuses on the green belt syllabus and how to employ a weapon of opportunity,” said Sgt. Brian W. Hayes, chief martial arts trainer, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion. “They learn what to do any time they are on the battlefield and they are in a situation where they can pick up any object to use as a weapon and take on any opponent.”

The techniques the students learned in this session were blocks, thrusts and reverse techniques with follow-on strikes, explained Hayes, a native of Eugene, Oregon.

“These Marines are learning these techniques inside and out because they are taking this course to be able to teach other Marines,” said the 31-year-old instructor. “They need to completely understand every aspect of these techniques before they go out on their own.”

Although it was offensive and defensive techniques the Marines repeated more times than not, the class has other purposes other than just learning how to block or take down an opponent.

“This course is professionally built,” said Sgt. Jason M. May, drill instructor, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, MAIC student. “The course encompasses the entire Marine concept.”

After each class, the Marines conduct guided discussions using case studies of past warriors and Marines who paid the ultimate sacrifice.

“We like to bring them in and talk about situations that have happened that relate to what they just learned,” said Hayes. “The biggest thing this course is about is leadership techniques, learning teamwork, taking charge and being a well-rounded ethical warrior.”

The MAIC is a 15-day course when Marines are taught and trained to instruct. They learn how to teach tan through green belt techniques so to assist Marines and help them achieve their next belt level.

According to May, the course is one of the toughest things he has done in his Marine Corps career.

“The MAIC is by far the most physically challenging thing I have ever done,” said May, a native of Bergenfield, New Jersey. “Doing the obstacle course, warm-up exercises, team building and physical training and classroom studies is extremely academically and physically strenuous.”

May explained how he encourages other Marines to take the challenge of the MAIC.

“You get to train with other Marines and learn how to motivate each other and how to keep pushing when you have nothing left,” said 33-year-old May. “It is definitely a great opportunity to be able to train with these instructors because they are very passionate about what they teach and care about the Marines they are teaching it to.”



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