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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

Recruits strike their way through MCMAP session

By Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | June 20, 2014

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Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, execute horizontal hammer strikes into a pad during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. As a training requirement, recruits are expected to learn the basics of MCMAP during their 12 weeks aboard the depot.

Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, execute horizontal hammer strikes into a pad during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. As a training requirement, recruits are expected to learn the basics of MCMAP during their 12 weeks aboard the depot. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher)


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Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, execute the horizontal hammer strike during a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program session aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M learned upper body strikes throughout the MCMAP class to prepare them for hand-to-hand combat.

Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, execute the horizontal hammer strike during a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program session aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M learned upper body strikes throughout the MCMAP class to prepare them for hand-to-hand combat. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher)


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Recruit Spencer J. Hamono, Platoon 3265, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, throws an eye gauge during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. As a recruit training requirement, recruits are expected to learn the basics of MCMAP during their 12 weeks aboard the depot. Hamono is a Roseville, Calif., native and was recruited from Recruiting Sub Station Roseville.

Recruit Spencer J. Hamono, Platoon 3265, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, throws an eye gauge during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. As a recruit training requirement, recruits are expected to learn the basics of MCMAP during their 12 weeks aboard the depot. Hamono is a Roseville, Calif., native and was recruited from Recruiting Sub Station Roseville. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher)


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Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, throw a front eye gauge during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M learned upper body strikes throughout the MCMAP class to prepare them for hand-to-hand combat.

Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, throw a front eye gauge during Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M learned upper body strikes throughout the MCMAP class to prepare them for hand-to-hand combat. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher)


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Sgt. Joseph A. Kimmel, Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Instructor, teaches Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, several different striking techniques during a MCMAP session aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M is currently on week two and has several weeks and MCMAP sessions to go before earning their tan belts and earning the title Marine.

Sgt. Joseph A. Kimmel, Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Instructor, teaches Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, several different striking techniques during a MCMAP session aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, June 13. Company M is currently on week two and has several weeks and MCMAP sessions to go before earning their tan belts and earning the title Marine. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher)


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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego --

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program training is given to build the recruits knowledge of the MCMAP techniques and warrior ethos.

According to retired Col. Roderick Smith, warrior ethos are based on the willingness to subordinate individual thoughts and concerns, including the concern to protect one's own life, for the good of the group and the mission. It's teamwork at its heart and teamwork in its most complex form.

“Each MCMAP session the recruits receive at recruit training gives them better survival skills if they are ever put in a combat situation,” said Sgt. Mike C. Simonsen, drill instructor, Platoon 3267. “A Marine is a warrior and a gentleman. The recruits learn to be both through MCMAP training as they learn warrior ethos.”

Company M learned upper body strikes throughout the MCMAP class to prepare them for hand-to-hand combat. Because Marines find themselves in combat environments, it is important recruits pay close attention to minor details now so they can execute each technique effectively later.

As a training requirement, recruits are expected to learn the basics of MCMAP during their 12 weeks aboard the depot. Once recruits have earned their tan belt in recruit training, they will be able to work toward attaining a higher belt with follow-on training in the Fleet Marine Force.

“We teach the basics here so they can build off of what they will already know in the fleet,” said Simonsen, a Bozeman, Montana native. “This is their second session of MCMAP training, and they will receive a lot more training toward earning their tan belts.”

Executing numerous repetitions of each move not only worked on their combat conditioning, but built muscle memory to ensure recruits can execute each move proficiently. 

“In combat, Marines don’t always have a lot of time to think about a situation so they have to be able to react within seconds. That is where countless repetitions from practice comes in to place,” said Recruit Zaine S. Wilcox, Platoon 3267. “The drill instructors make us keep pushing through each repetition even though we are exhausted because in a real life situation it’s a matter of life or death.”

Before leaving the class, Sgt. Joseph A. Kimmel, Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Instructor, made sure the recruits felt comfortable with the MCMAP techniques and how it could  effectively help them in a needed situation.

“If the situation occurred, I want to feel confident utilizing the MCMAP techniques to save my life or save the life of a fellow Marine,” said Wilcox, a Caldwell, Indiana native.

Company M is currently on week two and has several weeks and MCMAP sessions to go before earning their tan belts and earning the title Marine.



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