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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

Recruits learn about interior guard duty

By Lance Cpl. Tyler Viglione | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | April 25, 2014

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Company K recruits listen to Micheal R. Harrison, drill instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion, as he teaches them the third general order during the Interior Guard class aboard the depot, April 3.

Company K recruits listen to Micheal R. Harrison, drill instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion, as he teaches them the third general order during the Interior Guard class aboard the depot, April 3. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Tyler Viglione)


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SAN DIEGO --

Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, received a class on interior guard aboard the depot, April 3.

The purpose of the class was to teach recruits the basics of standing post and the different billets that are associated with it, explained Sgt. Anthony L. Williams, drill instructor, Platoon 3246.

“This may be one of the most important things recruits learn while they are in recruit training,” said Williams, a native of Benton Harbor, Mich. “Teaching them the basics early on in recruit training sets good guidelines for recruits in the future.”

Marines at duty stations around the world or in combat all stand guard in some way for an average of 24 hours. While a recruit or Marine is on duty, they take on the responsibility to watch and keep everybody else safe.
  
“No matter where a Marine is, there will always be duty,” said 27-year-old Williams. “We stress to the recruits that duty isn’t anything to take lightly because if anything were to happen during their post, it is ultimately their responsibility.”

Recruits were taught 11 general orders of standing post. These orders will follow them on every post they stand and are strictly enforced.  Not only did recruits review and memorize the orders but also received examples of consequences that may take place if any of these orders are violated.

“I didn’t realize how serious interior guard was until this class,” said Recruit Adam M. Emery, Plt. 3245. “It really hit me that when I stand a post everybody’s lives are potentially in my hands.”

During recruit training, recruits stand fire watch, which is approximately a one-hour shift watching over the platoon’s gear while the rest of the recruits sleep. Every hour recruits learn how to post and relieve from duty. Each recruit will stand fire watch multiple times while in recruit training because this is their first experience of any Marine Corps guard or duty.

Williams explains that he has experienced different situations while he stood a post or even events that have happened due to Marines not following orders.

“We make sure recruits understand the importance of their fire watches,” said Williams. “Even if it means that we don’t get that much sleep, it’s better knowing that we catch the mistakes that recruits make here instead of out in the fleet where it could cost somebody’s life.”

Although recruits learn the basics when they are in recruit training, once they graduate as Marines their training will evolve as they go further into their Marine Corps careers.

“I am going to do the best on post as I can,” said Emery. “Because one day it may help me save a Marine’s life.”



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