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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

One step closer to earning Marine title

By Sgt. Liz Gleason | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | July 17, 2013

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Sgt. Nicholas Milner, senior drill instructor, Company B, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, leads the platoon in executing eyes-right during Final Drill aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego June 15. Eyes right is a drill movement performed as the platoon marches past the flag, it represents a salute.

Sgt. Nicholas Milner, senior drill instructor, Company B, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, leads the platoon in executing eyes-right during Final Drill aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego June 15. Eyes right is a drill movement performed as the platoon marches past the flag, it represents a salute. (Photo by Sgt. Liz Gleason)


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Recruits with Company B, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, stand at port arms before executing right shoulder arms during Final Drill aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego June 15.

Recruits with Company B, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, stand at port arms before executing right shoulder arms during Final Drill aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego June 15. (Photo by Sgt. Liz Gleason)


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San Diego --

The recruits of Company B, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, spent the past ten weeks practicing and preparing for Final Drill. On Training Day 54 they  finally had the opportunity to showcase all their hard work.

Under the command of their senior drill instructor, the recruits displayed tight posture, performed sharp pivots and executed rifle manual with snap and pop aboard, Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego July 15.

“As we waited for our turn I was nervous but as soon as we stepped on the parade deck I got excited,” said Recruit Steven Roberts, Platoon 1034. “I knew this was our last chance to really drill and I had the trophy on my mind.”

Drill is a tradition that is taught throughout recruit training which instills some of the basic traits a Marine must have.  Drill is intended to teach recruits discipline, endurance, and attention to detail among other traits. These traits will help recruits as they go forth in their Marine Corps careers.

 “Final drill represents the blood, sweat and tears they’ve put into drill for the last three months. It’s their chance to show how much work they put in alongside their drill instructors,” said Sgt. Nicholas Milner, senior drill instructor. “It shows the amount of discipline and attentions to detail the recruits have gained throughout recruit training. It also allows them to come together as a team and improves unit cohesion as they’re all work toward a common goal.”

During the event, drill masters wander through the platoon meticulously inspecting and grading the performance of the senior drill instructors and his recruits.

Drill masters look at the execution and final product of movements to make sure it’s all in accordance with the drill manual. Final drill requires great attention to detail. Drill masters observe the discipline and teamwork of the platoon as well as their uniforms and hygiene, according to Milner.

 “We worked really hard and when it was time for final drill we went out, put our hearts into it. We gave it our all and although we didn’t win, we went out with a bang,” said Roberts.

Now that Final Drill is complete, the recruits of Co. B can put their focus into preparing for the Crucible. The Crucible is the 54-hour culminating event that challenges them physically and mentally, tests everything they’ve learned throughout recruit training, and gives them their chance to earn the title Marine.



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