Unit Banner could not be loaded.

 

Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

Haircuts remove individuality

By Cpl. Walter D. Marino II | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | May 13, 2013

Photos
prev
1 of 1
next
A recruit with Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, receives a haircut aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego April 25. Getting haircuts throughout training removes individuality from each recruit.

A recruit with Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, receives a haircut aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego April 25. Getting haircuts throughout training removes individuality from each recruit. (Photo by Cpl. Walter D. Marino II)


Photo Details | Download |

SAN DIEGO --     Long hair, piercings and beards are some of the features recruits have prior to recruit training. Now, on their way to becoming Marines, recruits are learning how to uphold a Marine image with weekly buzz cuts and daily morning shaves.
Recruits of Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, held the Marine standard with their weekly haircut aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego April 25.
    Upon entry to recruit training, recruits heads are shaved and soon after they are taught the standards they will have to comply with in the Marine Corps.
    Marines abide by rules that regulate hair length, weight, tattoos and piercings, and in recruit training drill instructors teach and enforce these regulations.
    “Of all the services, the Marines are the sharpest and (drill instructors) try and uphold that standard to the recruits from day one,” said Staff Sgt. Miguel Cortes, drill instructor, Platoon 2161, Co. H, 2nd RTBn. 
    For some recruits, the transition is harder for others. Before recruit training, Recruit Tanner L. Depwe, Plt. 2163, Co. H, 2nd RTBn., had hair that reached his mid-back, pierced ears and a goatee that reached his chest.
    “It was difficult to cut the hair, I had been growing it since junior high,” said Depwe, a Vinton, La., native. “But it was necessary in order to complete the dream of my brother who passed away.”
    Standing tall, clean shaven and with a fresh hair cut, it would be hard to imagine Depwe with his old style. 
    Depwe was not alone; many recruits sacrifice their personal styles to become Marines. For some it is a culture shock, but a sacrifice worth making for their goal. 
    “This is the first time I’ve had short hair,” said Recruit Jacob B. Marcussen, Plt. 2161, Co. H, 2nd RTBn. “But, I know I am bettering myself as a person—from a kid to an adult. It’s a good feeling knowing I’m taking a step forward.”
    Marcussen explained it was hard to get rid of the hair because he felt it was his identity, but he understood the reason behind having a professional appearance. 
    “Appearance is everything,” said Marcussen. “If you take care of the way you look, people are going to look at you in a different way—a more professional way.”
    As Co. H trickled out of the barber shop with fresh haircuts, none exited with grim faces. It appeared the recruits understood the importance of maintaining Marine standards.



1 Comments


  • Kim 343 days ago
    Uh-Uh-Uh!

    NOBODY TOUCHES MY HAIR!!!

    I don't care for image, style or appearances...but my Looks are important to both me and my loved ones!

    If I feel great, I look great. If I look good, I feel good.

    That's how it works with me. My loved ones recognize, appreciate and support me in that.

    Lions don't shave their manes...horses don't shave their locks... I fight like a Lion and run like a Horse (though a slow tiny one...maybe a pony, ha ha ha), so: WHY SHOULD I?

Add Comment

(required)
  Post Comment