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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego

Future legends learn the past

By Cpl. Matheus J. Hernandez | Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego | January 03, 2013

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Mike Whaley, a retired Marine and docent, explains a scale model display of the Pacific Theatre of War to recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion,during their tour of the depot's Command Museum aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 19.

Mike Whaley, a retired Marine and docent, explains a scale model display of the Pacific Theatre of War to recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion,during their tour of the depot's Command Museum aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 19. (Photo by Cpl. Matheus J. Hernandez)


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Arthur Barbosa, a retired Marine and docent, gives a class on Marine history to recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 19. The class took place during a tour of the Command Museum aboard MCRD San Diego.

Arthur Barbosa, a retired Marine and docent, gives a class on Marine history to recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 19. The class took place during a tour of the Command Museum aboard MCRD San Diego. (Photo by Cpl. Matheus J. Hernandez)


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San Diego --     Aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego is the Command Museum, dedicated to the preservation of the illustrious history and time-honored traditions of the Marine Corps. There, recruits are taught where their long line of honor, courage and commitment descended from.
    Recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, visited the museum during their time in recruit training aboard MCRD San Diego Dec. 19. The purpose of the company’s visit was to enlighten recruits of every battle and moment Marines have participated in since the birth of the Marine Corps.
    “It’s definitely interesting coming to the Command Museum and seeing how the Marine Corps has evolved,” said Recruit Alex M. Doyle, Platoon 1069, Co. D, 1stRTBn. “Finding out what Marines did and where it all started is (motivating).”
    The museum is designed to teach Marine Corps history, tradition and values while portraying the legacy of the Corps. It offers history of the Marine Corps from its birth to the present day, a reference center which contains archives and a research library, and classes and tours for Marines, recruits, and groups within the civilian community.
    “Right now, recruits are all focused on finding our roots,” said Doyle, an Antioch, Calif., native. “I already had a tremendous amount of respect for (Marines), but now it’s on a whole other level.”
    Recruits were split into groups by docents and were taken through the museum, witnessing what the Corps started from to where it is today. Docents were responsible for the sense of belonging recruits felt as they told stories of their earlier days as Marines, according to Recruit Elijah D. Jones, Plt. 1071, Co. D, 1st RTBn.
    “The docents have some great stories to tell from when they (served),” said Jones, an Omaha, Nebraska native. “Hearing their stories of old school Marines and all that they had to overcome was (inspiring).”
    As docents shared their memories of battles, some recruit noticed the clear sense of pride in the docents. It was the honor, courage and commitment that was instilled in the retired veterans, years before, that recruits saw.
    “Battles and technology have changed but the personality and mindset of a Marine seems to be the same,” said Jones. “You can tell from the docents.”
    Recruits continued to roam the halls of the museum after they were given a tour and found themselves one reason after another to be just as proud as the docents were—that was to hold the title Marine.
    “I like the amount of respect that’s given to history and tradition. Whether it was now or then, Marines are all the same,” said Doyle. “We’re all fighting for the same reason and I’m proud to have U.S. Marine on my chest.”



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